Best Classic Cars 

Time capsule 1987 Buick Grand National being auctioned on Ebay

The Buick Grand National was one of the great muscle cars of the 1980s and survivors remain coveted collectables today, but how great would it be if you could buy a brand new one? Well, you can. Almost. A black 1987 Grand National that was never registered, and has an interior that’s still wrapped in the plastic from the factory, is currently up for auction on Ebay.  (Ebay/nx512cj) It does have 49 miles on the odometer. The listing says that a lot of that was put there when the car’s first…

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Best 

Why Pushrod Engines Have a Low Redline

Pushrod engines are great for a lot of reasons. They’re compact, they’re simple, and if done right, they sound good. But one drawback of the pushrod design is that it can’t rev as high as a comparable overhead-cam engine. Pushrod engines are unique in that the camshaft is inside the cylinder block—not on top in the cylinder head. This makes engine height shorter, allowing for a more compact design. The downside is that the camshaft rotation has to travel through a pushrod and a rocker arm, which pushes a spring down…

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Best Classic Cars 

The One-And-Only 1937 Сhris Craft Motorhome

Named ‘The Zeppelin Roadliner’ by the famed customiser Art Himsl, this unusual vehicle is one he bought in the 1960’s. With its aluminium framing which was originally covered with a ‘Grade A’ linen aircraft fabric skin, it started out life as a prototype house car built by a mechanic at a Chris Craft boat dealership in San Francisco and was registered in 1942 as a Plymouth house car. Today the immaculately presented Zeppelin boasts a 350cubic inch V8 Chevy engine, push button automatic transmission, air-ride suspension, a refrigerator, microwave oven…

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Why the straight-six engine is making a comeback

The V8 engine has long ruled the world of luxury cars, thanks to glass-smooth grunt and a delicious howl under duress. But tightening fuel-economy regulations are encouraging the use of smaller piston counts, and on the standardized tests that automakers use for fuel-efficiency ratings, the average downsized, turbocharged V6 uses less fuel than an equally powerful V8. That may seem win-win, but don’t be won over. Engineers don’t fantasize about V6s—accountants do. The V6 layout has proliferated because it “packages well,” a sexless industry term that’s code for “easy to…

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